For their senior projects this year, members of the class of 2022 took on a wide array of independent projects with faculty advisors, including reexamining health care inequities within prison settings, building an electric go-kart, mapping the physics of a pirouette, and creating a cookbook with sustainable recipes.

Seniors presented their work in May in the SHAC atrium for fellow students, faculty, and staff. Projects ran the gamut from an electric go-kart built by Arthur Donohue ’22 with a max speed of 28 mph to the digitalization of CA’s archives by Yewon Kang ’22 and Melanie Tapia ’22, whose mixed-media “Concord Academy Digital Archive” comprised archival photographs and narratives of how CA has changed over its 100 year history. 

With a mix of formats and approaches, participants had many ways to engage with the seniors’ work. Emmy McCormack ’22 designed a trivia game to go alongside the sex education curriculum she designed, while Quinn Harnden ’22 and Sam Weitzman-Kurker ’22 invited participation to explore their findings from studying ADHD in Massachusetts schools and Narn Rojvachiranonda ’22 demonstrated a redesign of Boston’s MBTA transit maps.

More CA Magazine Stories

Nicole Rawling ’97 is Making Fashion Sustainable and Available

Nicole Rawling ’97 is Making Fashion Sustainable and Available

Co-founder and CEO of Material Innovation Initiative, Nicole Rawling ’97 is revolutionizing the materials we all use. Her organization is helping scientists, investors, and companies identify and create new plant-based materials to make the sustainable option the easy option.

Adnan Zubcevic ’75, 2022 Centennial Joan Shaw Herman Award Recipient, Finds in Treating Trauma a New Calling

Adnan Zubcevic ’75, 2022 Centennial Joan Shaw Herman Award Recipient, Finds in Treating Trauma a New Calling

During CA’s 100th birthday celebration in April, physician Adnan Zubcevic ’75 received the 2022 Centennial Joan Shaw Herman Award for his life’s work in support of immigrants and refugees. When he was a student at CA in his senior year, through the American Field Service, he little suspected that 20 years later he would return to Concord, Mass., fleeing the Bosnian War. In the Boston area, Zubcevic went on to launch many programs supporting immigrants and refugees, one of which has become a national model.